Scientist Find Over 1000 Octopuses In Largest Under Sea Nursery Ever

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A real live Garden of Octopuses! And you thought it was a made up Beatles Song! But the E/V Nautilus Found Massive Aggregations of Octopus Brooding Near Shimmering Seeps and made an amazing video!

But First Remember these lyrics?

I’d like to be under the sea
In an octopus’ garden in the shade
He’d let us in, knows where we’ve been
In his octopus’ garden in the shade
I’d ask my friends to come and see
An octopus’ garden with me
I’d like to be under the sea
In an octopus’ garden in the shade
He’d let us in, knows where we’ve been
In his octopus’ garden in the shade
I’d ask my friends to come…
According to the Beatles Bible this is Ringo Song, and here is how it all happened according to Ringo.

Ringo Starr’s second composition for The Beatles was written in Sardinia. On 22 August 1968 he temporarily walked out of sessions for the White Album after becoming disenchanted with the increasing tensions within the group. 

I wrote Octopus’s Garden in Sardinia. Peter Sellers had lent us his yacht and we went out for the day… I stayed out on deck with [the captain] and we talked about octopuses. He told me that they hang out in their caves and they go around the seabed finding shiny stones and tin cans and bottles to put in front of their cave like a garden. I thought this was fabulous, because at the time I just wanted to be under the sea too. A couple of tokes later with the guitar – and we had Octopus’s Garden!
– Ringo Starr

The song was first worked on by Starr and George Harrison during the Get Back sessions in January 1969; perhaps Harrison felt a sense of solidarity after feeling that his own compositions were being dismissed as second-rate by Lennon and McCartney.

However the real story is as follows.

According to E/V Nautilus they “observed over a thousand deep sea octopus (Muusoctopus robustus) while exploring Davidson Seamount with Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Never before seen in these massive aggregations, most female octopus were resting in a brooding posture, tucked into rocks with eight arms inverted covering their bodies and eggs. Many were tucked into rocks near shimmering fluid seeps, which were previously unknown to occur in this region!

E/V Nautilus is exploring unknown regions of the ocean seeking out new discoveries in biology, geology, and archaeology. Join us 24/7 for live video from the seafloor and to ask questions of our explorers currently aboard.” Nautilus: www.nautiluslive.org.